Potable water can be zapped from power plant steam thanks to new technology

About 39 percent of all water drawn from US rivers, lakes and reservoirs is used to cool electric power plants. What winds up happening with all that water is that it turns into steam which rises from the top of those plants’ cooling towers. A new system created at MIT, however, could convert that steam into clean drinking water. The system uses a variation of existing fog net technology and zaps the moist air with a beam of ions before it passes through the net. This causes the water droplets in the air to become electrically charged, so that they can drop and be captured.

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Potable water can be zapped from power plant steam thanks to new technology

About 39 percent of all water drawn from US rivers, lakes and reservoirs is used to cool electric power plants. What winds up happening with all that water is that it turns into steam which rises from the top of those plants’ cooling towers. A new system created at MIT, however, could convert that steam into clean drinking water. The system uses a variation of existing fog net technology and zaps the moist air with a beam of ions before it passes through the net. This causes the water droplets in the air to become electrically charged, so that they can drop and be captured.

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