This new research is good news for those with a gluten intolerance

If you have a gluten intolerance, we have some good news for you! Scientists are one step closer to an effective treatment for gluten intolerance including celiac disease. A recent clinical trial found the use of nanoparticles containing gliadin to be effective for “reprogramming” immune responses to gluten

Gliadin, which makes up about 70% of the protein in gluten, is what actually causes the negative immune response to gluten. Consistent exposure to gliadin is what creates faulty white blood cells called “gliadin-specific T lymphocytes” and leads to detrimental effects such as leaky gut and chronic inflammation. The researchers actually used these lymphocytes to their advantage in treating the negative effects. 

The researchers injected nanoparticles with gliadin into mice and found they exhibited noticeably less activation of the gliadin-specific T lymphocytes. They also had lower inflammation and tissue damage and showed further signs of gluten tolerance in their genes. 

It’s estimated that celiac affects up to 2.4 percent of the world’s population and up to 6 percent of Americans have a more general intolerance. Fortunately, the pharmaceutical company has received a license to develop the treatment for humans. If you’re gluten-intolerant or have celiac disease, you may soon be able to enjoy your gluten-free favorites!

Solution News Source

This new research is good news for those with a gluten intolerance

If you have a gluten intolerance, we have some good news for you! Scientists are one step closer to an effective treatment for gluten intolerance including celiac disease. A recent clinical trial found the use of nanoparticles containing gliadin to be effective for “reprogramming” immune responses to gluten

Gliadin, which makes up about 70% of the protein in gluten, is what actually causes the negative immune response to gluten. Consistent exposure to gliadin is what creates faulty white blood cells called “gliadin-specific T lymphocytes” and leads to detrimental effects such as leaky gut and chronic inflammation. The researchers actually used these lymphocytes to their advantage in treating the negative effects. 

The researchers injected nanoparticles with gliadin into mice and found they exhibited noticeably less activation of the gliadin-specific T lymphocytes. They also had lower inflammation and tissue damage and showed further signs of gluten tolerance in their genes. 

It’s estimated that celiac affects up to 2.4 percent of the world’s population and up to 6 percent of Americans have a more general intolerance. Fortunately, the pharmaceutical company has received a license to develop the treatment for humans. If you’re gluten-intolerant or have celiac disease, you may soon be able to enjoy your gluten-free favorites!

Solution News Source

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