How to live sustainably while quarantining at home

Among the downsides of people’s behavioral changes during the pandemic is that many have increasingly been opting for disposable packaging and protective gear as they are perceived to provide a sense of safety. Experts, however, warn that this mentality could end up harming us more in the long run. But fear not, it is still possible to stay sustainable while stuck indoors. Here are some easy ways you can care for the environment while stuck indoors:

Prepare a meal plan before buying groceries: Meal plans will prevent you from buying unnecessary products and ensure that you have everything you need. Apart from the financial benefits, this will also help you avoid frequent trips to the market.

Bring your own reusable tote bags and containers: BYOB (Bring Your Own Bag) still applies even during the pandemic. These are safer than plastic bags from markets because you know where they came from, as opposed to containers with an unknown source.

Buy fresh and local produce: Locally-produced food from public markets usually use less packaging because they are not wrapped individually and also have a lower carbon footprint because they are not transported from far away.

Cook the right amount of food for your family: Only prepare food your family can finish avoiding waste. There are also ways to make the most out of leftovers, like reusing trimmings and broths for next meals, storing leftovers in the refrigerator, serving leftovers to pets, and composting waste for home plants.

Say no to napkins and plastic utensils: When ordering take out, tell the restaurant to leave out disposable utensils and napkins and use what you have at home instead.

Let go of TV and computers: Homes are consuming electricity more now that people are staying indoors. While using your computer for work is unavoidable, taking a break from electronics during your downtime can help conserve energy. Instead of watching television or playing video games during the weekend, read a book, go to the park, exercise, or try a new hobby.

Start gardening: One hobby worth trying is gardening, which experts say is a good stress reliever. Planting your own produce will allow you to reuse empty containers as pots and waste as compost. To start, grab seeds from fruits and vegetables at home.

Use cloth masks: If you’re not a Patient Under Investigation (PUI) or Person Under Monitoring (PUM), you can use a reusable cloth mask when going outside. This is a more sustainable option and will save disposable masks for people on the front lines who need them more.

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How to live sustainably while quarantining at home

Among the downsides of people’s behavioral changes during the pandemic is that many have increasingly been opting for disposable packaging and protective gear as they are perceived to provide a sense of safety. Experts, however, warn that this mentality could end up harming us more in the long run. But fear not, it is still possible to stay sustainable while stuck indoors. Here are some easy ways you can care for the environment while stuck indoors:

Prepare a meal plan before buying groceries: Meal plans will prevent you from buying unnecessary products and ensure that you have everything you need. Apart from the financial benefits, this will also help you avoid frequent trips to the market.

Bring your own reusable tote bags and containers: BYOB (Bring Your Own Bag) still applies even during the pandemic. These are safer than plastic bags from markets because you know where they came from, as opposed to containers with an unknown source.

Buy fresh and local produce: Locally-produced food from public markets usually use less packaging because they are not wrapped individually and also have a lower carbon footprint because they are not transported from far away.

Cook the right amount of food for your family: Only prepare food your family can finish avoiding waste. There are also ways to make the most out of leftovers, like reusing trimmings and broths for next meals, storing leftovers in the refrigerator, serving leftovers to pets, and composting waste for home plants.

Say no to napkins and plastic utensils: When ordering take out, tell the restaurant to leave out disposable utensils and napkins and use what you have at home instead.

Let go of TV and computers: Homes are consuming electricity more now that people are staying indoors. While using your computer for work is unavoidable, taking a break from electronics during your downtime can help conserve energy. Instead of watching television or playing video games during the weekend, read a book, go to the park, exercise, or try a new hobby.

Start gardening: One hobby worth trying is gardening, which experts say is a good stress reliever. Planting your own produce will allow you to reuse empty containers as pots and waste as compost. To start, grab seeds from fruits and vegetables at home.

Use cloth masks: If you’re not a Patient Under Investigation (PUI) or Person Under Monitoring (PUM), you can use a reusable cloth mask when going outside. This is a more sustainable option and will save disposable masks for people on the front lines who need them more.

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