Humorous posters urge National Park visitors to stay a bear’s length apart

As quarantined visitors itch to get back into nature, national parks across the country are moving to reopen. However, even in the vastness of the outdoors, park officials still have concerns about the spread of Covid-19. The National Parks Service has rolled out some creative new posters that are both humorous and informative to keep guests healthy. 

One creative image demonstrates what six feet looks like with park references. If you were curious, six feet is also about the span of a moose’s antlers, two picnic tables, and a national park welcome sign. 

Another design urges visitors to use the same precautions with other guests as they would with wildlife: maintain your distance, stay home if you’re sick, and wash hands frequently. 

If you can’t access a park, other posters urge would-be visitors to take advantage of free digital tours online. Options include the Nahuku Lava Tube in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, the dark sky-certified beauty of Utah’s Bryce Canyon National Park, and the world’s third-largest coral reef at Florida’s Dry Tortugas National Park.

Getting out in nature is one of the safest ways to relax and get out of the house, but it’s important to maintain precautions even in the great outdoors. Check out all the posters at the link below for some summertime adventure inspiration and a bit of a chuckle.

Solution News Source

Humorous posters urge National Park visitors to stay a bear’s length apart

As quarantined visitors itch to get back into nature, national parks across the country are moving to reopen. However, even in the vastness of the outdoors, park officials still have concerns about the spread of Covid-19. The National Parks Service has rolled out some creative new posters that are both humorous and informative to keep guests healthy. 

One creative image demonstrates what six feet looks like with park references. If you were curious, six feet is also about the span of a moose’s antlers, two picnic tables, and a national park welcome sign. 

Another design urges visitors to use the same precautions with other guests as they would with wildlife: maintain your distance, stay home if you’re sick, and wash hands frequently. 

If you can’t access a park, other posters urge would-be visitors to take advantage of free digital tours online. Options include the Nahuku Lava Tube in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, the dark sky-certified beauty of Utah’s Bryce Canyon National Park, and the world’s third-largest coral reef at Florida’s Dry Tortugas National Park.

Getting out in nature is one of the safest ways to relax and get out of the house, but it’s important to maintain precautions even in the great outdoors. Check out all the posters at the link below for some summertime adventure inspiration and a bit of a chuckle.

Solution News Source

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