USPS delays cutbacks until after November’s election

We recently shared an article about how you can help save the US Postal Service. From grandma’s birthday cards to the integrity and safety of our elections, the USPS is a critical public service which we all rely on. Thanks to the activism and action of thousands of Americans, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy announced the USPS will halt its controversial cost-cutting initiatives until after the election. 

The defunding measures, including service reductions, prohibiting overtime hours, and the removal of mail-sorting machines, were instituted by DeJoy after he took the position in June. Measures were also in place to cut 10 percent of sorting machines inventory and relocate post boxes in a number of states. 

The importance of the USPS in mail-in voting proceedings, especially during a pandemic, caused citizens and lawmakers alike to question the decision and its threat to a fair and just election in the fall. Many activists also pointed out that much like other government services, the USPS is not intended to be a for-profit entity, but rather a service for and funded by the taxpayer. For many Americans living in rural areas, the USPS offers a sole connection point for sending a receiving mail where private delivery companies won’t operate.

Although this does leave the postal service at risk after November, it demonstrates the power of swift activism on the part of citizens to protect their democracy. As encouraged in our earlier article, many citizens advertised the unjust actions on social media, bought stamps, and emailed their representatives to save the postal service. Lawmakers also prepared to question DeJoy and USPS board of governors Chairman Robert M. Duncan this week and next about the decisions to limit funding. 

Despite being delayed for now, we will continue to cover this progressing story and promote solutions to saving this critical public service even after the election. 

Solution News Source

USPS delays cutbacks until after November’s election

We recently shared an article about how you can help save the US Postal Service. From grandma’s birthday cards to the integrity and safety of our elections, the USPS is a critical public service which we all rely on. Thanks to the activism and action of thousands of Americans, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy announced the USPS will halt its controversial cost-cutting initiatives until after the election. 

The defunding measures, including service reductions, prohibiting overtime hours, and the removal of mail-sorting machines, were instituted by DeJoy after he took the position in June. Measures were also in place to cut 10 percent of sorting machines inventory and relocate post boxes in a number of states. 

The importance of the USPS in mail-in voting proceedings, especially during a pandemic, caused citizens and lawmakers alike to question the decision and its threat to a fair and just election in the fall. Many activists also pointed out that much like other government services, the USPS is not intended to be a for-profit entity, but rather a service for and funded by the taxpayer. For many Americans living in rural areas, the USPS offers a sole connection point for sending a receiving mail where private delivery companies won’t operate.

Although this does leave the postal service at risk after November, it demonstrates the power of swift activism on the part of citizens to protect their democracy. As encouraged in our earlier article, many citizens advertised the unjust actions on social media, bought stamps, and emailed their representatives to save the postal service. Lawmakers also prepared to question DeJoy and USPS board of governors Chairman Robert M. Duncan this week and next about the decisions to limit funding. 

Despite being delayed for now, we will continue to cover this progressing story and promote solutions to saving this critical public service even after the election. 

Solution News Source

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