To vote or not to vote? 7 Facts on why you should

We recently published an article on how to vote during a pandemic, but let’s take a step back and talk about why you should vote at all. If you’re on the fence about exercising your civil liberties or even if you’re a passionate advocate for democratic participation, here’s seven facts that demonstrate why your vote matters!

  1. The young vote carries weight. Young voters have some of the lowest turnout rates around the world, yet they make up one third of eligible voters. Generation Z is also the most ethnically and racially diverse group of voters and will be impacted for the longest by policies and candidates elected. Almost twice as many millennials voted in 2018 than in 2014, but we need to continue to up these numbers. If you’re a young voter, you and your peers hold real weight in this upcoming election, so register today!
  2. You can register before you turn 18. Another stat for young voters: You must be a legal adult to cast a general election ballot, but many states allow you to preregister to vote as young as 16 and some even allow 17-year-olds participate in primary elections.
  3. A single vote can make a difference. It can feel like the actions of one person are insignificant in a sea of citizens, but over the past 20 years, more than a dozen races were decided by a single vote or ended in a tie.
  4. More companies are giving employees flexibility to exercise their civic duty. In 2014, 35 percent of people didn’t vote because of a scheduling conflict, but companies in 22 states are required to provide paid time off to vote. If your state isn’t one of them, registering for a mail-in ballot is an effective and quick way to still make your voice heard. 
  5. Mail-in capabilities are expanding. Whether due to pandemic concerns or other mobility issues, it’s not always easy to go wait in line at your local polling station. Fortunately, more states are allowing citizens to vote by mail and five are even mandating it. Check out our map here to see what the rules for vote-in mailing look like in your state. 
  6. Early voting improved turnout. Early voting has been linked to improved voter turnout due to higher flexibility for voters. South Dakota and Minnesota open up early in-person voting with an absentee ballot up to 46 days before the general election.
  7. Online resources make registration all the more easy. With the ease of the internet, you can now register to vote in 39 states and easily check your voter registration online. In some states, you can even check to see when your ballot was counted if you mailed it in. 

Unfortunately, voter turnout in the US is much lower than other developed nations, but it is an unparalleled way to have a say in the future laws and leaders of our country. Election day is November 3. We hope these stats encourage you to cast your ballot. If you haven’t registered to vote yet, do so here.  

Solution News Source

To vote or not to vote? 7 Facts on why you should

We recently published an article on how to vote during a pandemic, but let’s take a step back and talk about why you should vote at all. If you’re on the fence about exercising your civil liberties or even if you’re a passionate advocate for democratic participation, here’s seven facts that demonstrate why your vote matters!

  1. The young vote carries weight. Young voters have some of the lowest turnout rates around the world, yet they make up one third of eligible voters. Generation Z is also the most ethnically and racially diverse group of voters and will be impacted for the longest by policies and candidates elected. Almost twice as many millennials voted in 2018 than in 2014, but we need to continue to up these numbers. If you’re a young voter, you and your peers hold real weight in this upcoming election, so register today!
  2. You can register before you turn 18. Another stat for young voters: You must be a legal adult to cast a general election ballot, but many states allow you to preregister to vote as young as 16 and some even allow 17-year-olds participate in primary elections.
  3. A single vote can make a difference. It can feel like the actions of one person are insignificant in a sea of citizens, but over the past 20 years, more than a dozen races were decided by a single vote or ended in a tie.
  4. More companies are giving employees flexibility to exercise their civic duty. In 2014, 35 percent of people didn’t vote because of a scheduling conflict, but companies in 22 states are required to provide paid time off to vote. If your state isn’t one of them, registering for a mail-in ballot is an effective and quick way to still make your voice heard. 
  5. Mail-in capabilities are expanding. Whether due to pandemic concerns or other mobility issues, it’s not always easy to go wait in line at your local polling station. Fortunately, more states are allowing citizens to vote by mail and five are even mandating it. Check out our map here to see what the rules for vote-in mailing look like in your state. 
  6. Early voting improved turnout. Early voting has been linked to improved voter turnout due to higher flexibility for voters. South Dakota and Minnesota open up early in-person voting with an absentee ballot up to 46 days before the general election.
  7. Online resources make registration all the more easy. With the ease of the internet, you can now register to vote in 39 states and easily check your voter registration online. In some states, you can even check to see when your ballot was counted if you mailed it in. 

Unfortunately, voter turnout in the US is much lower than other developed nations, but it is an unparalleled way to have a say in the future laws and leaders of our country. Election day is November 3. We hope these stats encourage you to cast your ballot. If you haven’t registered to vote yet, do so here.  

Solution News Source

SIGN UP

TO GET A Free DAILY DOSE OF OPTIMISM

Optimist Subscriber
Delivery Frequency *
reCAPTCHA

We respect your privacy and take protecting it seriously. Privacy Policy