We are one step closer to finding an effective treatment for MS

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have a taken key step in finding a treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). In a clinical trial of the cancer drug bexarotene, it was found that the drug repairs the protective myelin coatings around nerves that are damaged by the disease.

The only issue is that while bexarotene can repair the myelin coatings that MS destroys, the drug itself cannot be used as a treatment because the side-effects are too serious. Nonetheless, the scientists behind the trial said the results showed “remyelination” was possible in humans, suggesting other drugs or drug combinations will halt MS.

MS arises when the immune system mistakenly attacks the fatty myelin coating that wraps around nerves in the brain and spinal cord. Without the lipid-rich substance, signals travel more slowly along nerves or can fail to get through at all, which can cause a range of neurological problems including balance, vision and muscle disorders, and ultimately, disability.

The good news is that it seems we are one step closer to a real treatment for this terrible disease.

“The results of this trial give us confidence that medicines that promote myelin regeneration will have a real impact on the treatment of MS, and we look forward to the outcome of future trials with increased optimism,” said Robin Franklin, professor at the Wellcome-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute.

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We are one step closer to finding an effective treatment for MS

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have a taken key step in finding a treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). In a clinical trial of the cancer drug bexarotene, it was found that the drug repairs the protective myelin coatings around nerves that are damaged by the disease.

The only issue is that while bexarotene can repair the myelin coatings that MS destroys, the drug itself cannot be used as a treatment because the side-effects are too serious. Nonetheless, the scientists behind the trial said the results showed “remyelination” was possible in humans, suggesting other drugs or drug combinations will halt MS.

MS arises when the immune system mistakenly attacks the fatty myelin coating that wraps around nerves in the brain and spinal cord. Without the lipid-rich substance, signals travel more slowly along nerves or can fail to get through at all, which can cause a range of neurological problems including balance, vision and muscle disorders, and ultimately, disability.

The good news is that it seems we are one step closer to a real treatment for this terrible disease.

“The results of this trial give us confidence that medicines that promote myelin regeneration will have a real impact on the treatment of MS, and we look forward to the outcome of future trials with increased optimism,” said Robin Franklin, professor at the Wellcome-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute.

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