Swedish grocery store prices items based on their carbon footprint

We make decisions at the grocery store based on how much things cost, but when was the last time you made a purchase decision based on the carbon cost of a product? A new grocery store in Sweden is making it easier to shop consciously with the price of items based on their carbon footprint. 

Operated by the Swedish food brand, Felix, The Climate Store demonstrates the carbon impact differences between plant-based and meat-based foods as well as the toll that long-distance food shipping takes on the planet. 

Food production is responsible for about one-quarter of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, but it’s not always clear which foods are the biggest culprits. The store allocates shoppers a weekly budget of 18.9kg CO2, so customers must think critically about the footprint of their regular shopping habits. They are also more aware of the direct impact of their purchases. 

Moving forward, the store plans to expand its labeling to include a more detailed breakdown of products’ carbon footprints. It’s a fun challenge for shoppers to see if they can keep their carbon purchases within budget, but on a more impactful level, the store also financially rewards shoppers for habits that reduce their impact on the planet. In this way, shoppers trend towards buying local, seasonal, plant-based products.

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Swedish grocery store prices items based on their carbon footprint

We make decisions at the grocery store based on how much things cost, but when was the last time you made a purchase decision based on the carbon cost of a product? A new grocery store in Sweden is making it easier to shop consciously with the price of items based on their carbon footprint. 

Operated by the Swedish food brand, Felix, The Climate Store demonstrates the carbon impact differences between plant-based and meat-based foods as well as the toll that long-distance food shipping takes on the planet. 

Food production is responsible for about one-quarter of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, but it’s not always clear which foods are the biggest culprits. The store allocates shoppers a weekly budget of 18.9kg CO2, so customers must think critically about the footprint of their regular shopping habits. They are also more aware of the direct impact of their purchases. 

Moving forward, the store plans to expand its labeling to include a more detailed breakdown of products’ carbon footprints. It’s a fun challenge for shoppers to see if they can keep their carbon purchases within budget, but on a more impactful level, the store also financially rewards shoppers for habits that reduce their impact on the planet. In this way, shoppers trend towards buying local, seasonal, plant-based products.

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