Construction project completes the world’s first 3D printed two-story home

Considered one of the largest sources of environmental pollution in the world, it’s no secret that the construction industry is in need of a green revamp. One way the sector could shift towards more sustainable practices is by integrating 3D printing technology within its modus operandi. A recent project in Belgium shows that this transition may happen sooner than we thought.

In a landmark achievement for the industry, Belgium-based construction company Kamp C revealed that it has recently completed 3D printing the world’s first two-story home.

Using Europe’s largest 3D concrete printer, the company built what’s thought to be the first two-story house to be 3D printed in one piece. The 90-square meter dwelling measures eight meters tall, which is the average size of terraced houses in the region.

“What makes this house so unique, is that we printed it with a fixed 3D concrete printer,” said Emiel Ascione, the project manager at Kamp C. “Other houses that were printed around the world only have one floor. In many cases, the components were printed in a factory and were assembled on-site. We, however, printed the entire building envelope in one piece on-site.”

The main aim behind the project is to showcase 3D concrete printing as a building technique that could green up the Belgian construction industry while allowing construction companies to build more efficiently.

As reported by Kamp C, its printed home is not only three times sturdier than those built with conventional quick build bricks, but using the 3D printer also enabled the company to save an estimated 60 percent on material, time, and budget, requiring less wire-mesh reinforcement than similar projects.

For now, the 3D printed house will serve as a test that researchers will monitor for solidity over time. In the future, the company hopes to get printing time down from three weeks to just under two days.

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Construction project completes the world’s first 3D printed two-story home

Considered one of the largest sources of environmental pollution in the world, it’s no secret that the construction industry is in need of a green revamp. One way the sector could shift towards more sustainable practices is by integrating 3D printing technology within its modus operandi. A recent project in Belgium shows that this transition may happen sooner than we thought.

In a landmark achievement for the industry, Belgium-based construction company Kamp C revealed that it has recently completed 3D printing the world’s first two-story home.

Using Europe’s largest 3D concrete printer, the company built what’s thought to be the first two-story house to be 3D printed in one piece. The 90-square meter dwelling measures eight meters tall, which is the average size of terraced houses in the region.

“What makes this house so unique, is that we printed it with a fixed 3D concrete printer,” said Emiel Ascione, the project manager at Kamp C. “Other houses that were printed around the world only have one floor. In many cases, the components were printed in a factory and were assembled on-site. We, however, printed the entire building envelope in one piece on-site.”

The main aim behind the project is to showcase 3D concrete printing as a building technique that could green up the Belgian construction industry while allowing construction companies to build more efficiently.

As reported by Kamp C, its printed home is not only three times sturdier than those built with conventional quick build bricks, but using the 3D printer also enabled the company to save an estimated 60 percent on material, time, and budget, requiring less wire-mesh reinforcement than similar projects.

For now, the 3D printed house will serve as a test that researchers will monitor for solidity over time. In the future, the company hopes to get printing time down from three weeks to just under two days.

Solution News Source

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