Magnetic therapy and health

Tijn Touber | March 2005 issue

Magnetic therapy is being used to treat a wide array of illnesses and disorders. Magnets work very well to ease pain—by quickly transporting waste material out of the cells and numbing nerve pathways. Magnets have shown success in cases of arthritis, rheumatism, back pain, head and shoulder pain, fractures, tears, sprains and joint pain.

There are two kinds of magnetic therapy: fixed magnets and electromagnets. Electromagnets are the strongest and produce the most clearly visible results. Two companies, Magnopro and Bemer, carry electromagnetic mattresses featuring different settings geared towards different disorders. The Bemer-3000 mattress is an invention of the German doctor Wolfgang Kafka. Bemer has sold over 50,000 mattresses in 35 countries, including 300 hospitals and more than 3,000 doctors.

Electromagnetic mattresses improve blood flow, which enables cells to better absorb oxygen. The cells then regenerate more quickly and remain healthier. The mattresses also stimulate the body’s metabolism, which accelerates the removal of toxins.

However, strong electromagnets are not necessarily better than weaker fixed ones. A fixed magnet’s weaker field can, in fact, be very effective in cases of chronic disorders. Fixed magnets can be worn on the body for a long time. The Japanese company Nikken uses “bipolar” fixed magnets that mimic the earth’s magnetic field. Nikken sells a broad selection of magnetic items: necklaces, socks, insoles for shoes, mattresses, pillows, comforters, separate magnets and devices to magnetize water.

It is important to approach magnetic therapy carefully. Artificial frequencies can affect the body’s natural frequencies, which can strengthen, weaken or extinguish them. When wavelengths resonate with one another, small amounts of energy can produce big changes because they reinforce each other.

Moreover, regular exposure to the same frequency can be damaging. This is why electromagnetic mattresses are made to produce different fields, depending on the setting. The mattress’s instructions will tell you how it can best be used on a daily basis to promote good health. People with pacemakers or other implanted electronic devices are generally advised not to use magnets. It is also discouraged if you have a bleeding wound or are pregnant. However, there is no scientific evidence that magnetic therapy is harmful to the fetus.

Because magnetic fields enhance the growth of cells, it seems likely that viruses and cancers could be stimulated by magnet therapy. This however does not seem to be the case. William Pawluk says: “Most of the research with most magnetic signals indicates that viruses are not much affected by magnetic fields. The body’s immune responses to most magnetic fields is enhanced and helps the body to fight the viral infections. For cancer cells the picture is more complicated and very inconsistent. Research being done in the USA is showing that magnets enhance the kill rates of chemotherapy but do not appear to be cancer initiators. They may temporarily give energy to cancer cells to grow in the laboratory and in some animals but in the living human this does not seem to be bearing out. I will say that magnets cannot be thought of as curing cancer. They should be used alongside other treatments.”

For more information:
· Bemer: Innomed International AG, Schliessa 12, FL-9495 Triesen, Germany, telephone +423 399 3999, innomed@innomed.li, www.bemer3000.com
· Magnopro: 1645 S. River Road Suite 5, Des Plaines, IL 60018, USA, telephone +1 847 299 9829, info@bodyfields.com, www.bodyfields.com
· Nikken: 1 Deltic Avenue, Rooksley, Milton Keynes, MK13 8LD, England, telephone +44 1908 202 421, www.nikkenuk.com
· www.drpawluk.com

Solution News Source

Magnetic therapy and health

Tijn Touber | March 2005 issue

Magnetic therapy is being used to treat a wide array of illnesses and disorders. Magnets work very well to ease pain—by quickly transporting waste material out of the cells and numbing nerve pathways. Magnets have shown success in cases of arthritis, rheumatism, back pain, head and shoulder pain, fractures, tears, sprains and joint pain.

There are two kinds of magnetic therapy: fixed magnets and electromagnets. Electromagnets are the strongest and produce the most clearly visible results. Two companies, Magnopro and Bemer, carry electromagnetic mattresses featuring different settings geared towards different disorders. The Bemer-3000 mattress is an invention of the German doctor Wolfgang Kafka. Bemer has sold over 50,000 mattresses in 35 countries, including 300 hospitals and more than 3,000 doctors.

Electromagnetic mattresses improve blood flow, which enables cells to better absorb oxygen. The cells then regenerate more quickly and remain healthier. The mattresses also stimulate the body’s metabolism, which accelerates the removal of toxins.

However, strong electromagnets are not necessarily better than weaker fixed ones. A fixed magnet’s weaker field can, in fact, be very effective in cases of chronic disorders. Fixed magnets can be worn on the body for a long time. The Japanese company Nikken uses “bipolar” fixed magnets that mimic the earth’s magnetic field. Nikken sells a broad selection of magnetic items: necklaces, socks, insoles for shoes, mattresses, pillows, comforters, separate magnets and devices to magnetize water.

It is important to approach magnetic therapy carefully. Artificial frequencies can affect the body’s natural frequencies, which can strengthen, weaken or extinguish them. When wavelengths resonate with one another, small amounts of energy can produce big changes because they reinforce each other.

Moreover, regular exposure to the same frequency can be damaging. This is why electromagnetic mattresses are made to produce different fields, depending on the setting. The mattress’s instructions will tell you how it can best be used on a daily basis to promote good health. People with pacemakers or other implanted electronic devices are generally advised not to use magnets. It is also discouraged if you have a bleeding wound or are pregnant. However, there is no scientific evidence that magnetic therapy is harmful to the fetus.

Because magnetic fields enhance the growth of cells, it seems likely that viruses and cancers could be stimulated by magnet therapy. This however does not seem to be the case. William Pawluk says: “Most of the research with most magnetic signals indicates that viruses are not much affected by magnetic fields. The body’s immune responses to most magnetic fields is enhanced and helps the body to fight the viral infections. For cancer cells the picture is more complicated and very inconsistent. Research being done in the USA is showing that magnets enhance the kill rates of chemotherapy but do not appear to be cancer initiators. They may temporarily give energy to cancer cells to grow in the laboratory and in some animals but in the living human this does not seem to be bearing out. I will say that magnets cannot be thought of as curing cancer. They should be used alongside other treatments.”

For more information:
· Bemer: Innomed International AG, Schliessa 12, FL-9495 Triesen, Germany, telephone +423 399 3999, innomed@innomed.li, www.bemer3000.com
· Magnopro: 1645 S. River Road Suite 5, Des Plaines, IL 60018, USA, telephone +1 847 299 9829, info@bodyfields.com, www.bodyfields.com
· Nikken: 1 Deltic Avenue, Rooksley, Milton Keynes, MK13 8LD, England, telephone +44 1908 202 421, www.nikkenuk.com
· www.drpawluk.com

Solution News Source

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