Nigerian citizen designs portable hand-washing stations for his city

Hand-washing is one of the most promoted and effective ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19, but what about regions where hand-washing facilities are not readily accessible? An estimated 157 million Nigerians lack adequate hand-washing facilities, which prompted one resident, Bamigbose Adams, to start creating hand-washing stations out of an unusual source: old metal drums. 

Adams is a furniture maker, but as COVID-19 began to sweep the globe, he turned his attention to protecting the health of citizens in the highly populated city of Lagos he calls home. The innovative technique uses an old oil drum with a sink embedded in the top. A simple water source, like a hose, connects water to the faucet and used water and soap waste is collected in the large drum below. 

Adams designed the model to be used on a temporary basis by businesses, restaurants, and schools. He sells each portable sink for $70 and already has many orders lined up to be filled. 

Although Adams recognizes that these sinks are meant to be only temporary installations, they are playing a critical role in providing hand-washing services to the many citizens who may not have access to them at their home or place of work. Additionally, placing the hand-washing stations in highly trafficked areas will cut down on the spread of the disease as large cities throughout the country move into quarantine this week.

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Nigerian citizen designs portable hand-washing stations for his city

Hand-washing is one of the most promoted and effective ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19, but what about regions where hand-washing facilities are not readily accessible? An estimated 157 million Nigerians lack adequate hand-washing facilities, which prompted one resident, Bamigbose Adams, to start creating hand-washing stations out of an unusual source: old metal drums. 

Adams is a furniture maker, but as COVID-19 began to sweep the globe, he turned his attention to protecting the health of citizens in the highly populated city of Lagos he calls home. The innovative technique uses an old oil drum with a sink embedded in the top. A simple water source, like a hose, connects water to the faucet and used water and soap waste is collected in the large drum below. 

Adams designed the model to be used on a temporary basis by businesses, restaurants, and schools. He sells each portable sink for $70 and already has many orders lined up to be filled. 

Although Adams recognizes that these sinks are meant to be only temporary installations, they are playing a critical role in providing hand-washing services to the many citizens who may not have access to them at their home or place of work. Additionally, placing the hand-washing stations in highly trafficked areas will cut down on the spread of the disease as large cities throughout the country move into quarantine this week.

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